Darwiniana

History, Evolution, and The Darwin Debate

Darwiniana header image 2

A hidden entrance to ‘transcendental idealism’

March 10th, 2009 · 8 Comments

The issue of Kant’s transcendental idealism has always far too arcane for easy understanding, as the previous post on Tittle suggested. What a pity!
It might help to study the eonic effect, where the noumenal/phenomenal distinction arises in a simple and practical way, without much philosophy.
Here is a piece on ‘Kant’s Challenge’:
Kant’s Challenge

A noumenal mystery Our eonic model almost automatically produces a structure isomorphic to Kant’s distinction of noumenon and phenomenon, and it does so deftly using different concepts and without any of the complications that haunt the original. Isomorphic, but in a different context, large-scale history. Since this was serendipitous, and unasked for, we are left to wonder what this means. The problem is that history is all of a piece, phenomenon, including our eonic sequence. And yet this sequence stages the hard evidence of the ‘uncaused freedom emergence factor’ inside a temporal oscillation. All we can do is notice this isomorphism, and proceed on our own way with our self-sufficient model, which exploits a dualism of levels for purely practical system model reasons. So what is the relationship of our eonic sequence to this enigma of Kant? Since our transitions are phenomenon yet noumenally tuned, we must consider that in some fashion our eonic sequence oscillates near the limits of manifestation (a statement bordering on a kind of metaphysics we haven’t allowed), and at the limits of our representations we see the inexplicable appearance of the freedom generator. The long lost mediating factor between the phenomenon and the noumenon suddenly appears, where least expected, in history itself. We must suspect that the ‘teleological’ aspect is beyond the limits of our representations, noumenal, as all that we see is phenomenon, directionality, a stupendous oscillation in the degrees of freedom of the system execution.

Tags: selections · World History and The Eonic Effect

8 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Stephen P. Smith // Mar 10, 2009 at 9:15 pm

    “… temporal oscillation. All we can do is notice this isomorphism, and proceed on our own way with our self-sufficient model, which exploits a dualism of levels for purely practical system model reasons….. Since our transitions are phenomenon yet noumenally tuned, we must consider that in some fashion our eonic sequence oscillates near the limits of manifestation (a statement bordering on a kind of metaphysics we haven’t allowed), and at the limits of our representations we see the inexplicable appearance of the freedom generator. The long lost mediating factor between the phenomenon and the noumenon suddenly appears, where least expected, in history itself. We must suspect that the ‘teleological’ aspect is beyond the limits of our representations, noumenal, as all that we see is phenomenon, directionality, a stupendous oscillation”

    I was born under a wandering star!

  • 2 nemo // Mar 11, 2009 at 12:15 pm

    What?

    (explain)

  • 3 Stephen P. Smith // Mar 11, 2009 at 1:37 pm

    A “stupendous oscillation,” and somethings slips off into the “noumenal.” These are your words, are they not?

    Follow it if you may, and enter the “hidden entrance to transcendental idealism.” But don’t be too literal and controlling with the “mediating factor between the phenomenon and the noumenon,” it does not fit to our caricatures. Again these are your words, and it seems we are always saying goodbye (i.e., looking back at the “appearance of the freedom generator” and finding the eonic pattern).

    We heard this song before in the lyrics below!

    BORN UNDER A WANDERIN’ STAR

    I was born under a wanderin’ star.
    I was born under a wanderin’ star.

    Wheels are made for rollin’, mules are made to pack.
    I’ve never seen a site that didn’t look better lookin’ back.

    I was born under a wanderin’ star.

    Mud can make you prisoner and the plains can bake you dry.
    Snow can burn your eyes but only people make you cry.
    Home is made for comin’ from, for dreams of goin’ to.
    Which with any luck will never come true.

    I was born under a wanderin’ star.
    I was born under a wanderin’ star.

    Do I know where hell is, hell is in hell-o.
    Heaven is good-bye forever it’s time for me to go.

    I was born under a wanderin’ star, a wanderin’, wanderin’ star.

    Mud can make you prisoner and the plains can bake you dry.
    Snow can burn your eyes but only people make you cry.
    Home is made for comin’ from, for dreams of goin’ to.
    Which with any luck will never come true.

    I was born under a wanderin’ star.
    I was born under a wanderin’ star.

    When I get to heaven tie me to a tree.
    Or I’ll begin to roam and soon you’ll know where I will be.

    I was born under a wanderin’ star.
    A wanderin’, wanderin’ star.

  • 4 nemo // Mar 11, 2009 at 3:29 pm

    I will have to play dumb on this one.

  • 5 James // Mar 11, 2009 at 3:36 pm

    WTF!?

  • 6 Darwiniana » Wild goose chase of phenomenal ‘theories of evolution’ // Mar 11, 2009 at 3:39 pm

    […] Comment on A hidden entrance to ‘transcendental idealism’ Thanks for these remarks, whatever they mean. […]

  • 7 nemo // Mar 11, 2009 at 6:40 pm

    Hucklebird is a crypto-Hegelian: whenever he sees a phrase like ‘mediating the noumenon and the phenomenon’ he leaps from the Bushes in Hegelian war paint.

    I value his opinions, in any case.

    The idea that the hidden teleological expresses itself as a cyclical phenomenon is perhaps the most original idea in the eonic model, but it may not make any sense at first.

  • 8 Darwiniana » Striking out on transcendental idealism // Mar 11, 2009 at 6:59 pm

    […] Comments on A Hidden Entrance To Transcendental Idealism OUr culture forces us to strike out completely on the issues of transcendental idealism. I am not a member of the cult, only a student of the way that Kant and Newton work together in the drama of the Enlightenment. The question is not hard: if you accept universal causality then question of values, ethics, freedom, and the aesthetic are illusions, with no further place in human life in an age of science. Kant saw this absurd consequence in the legacy of Newton and mapped out a way to deal with it. […]

Leave a Comment