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The King James Bible and the eonic effect

December 17th, 2010 · No Comments

Forgive me, spirit of science By RICHARD DAWKINS – NEW STATESMAN, CHRISTMAS SPECIAL, 20TH DECEMBER 2010
Added: Wednesday, 15 December 2010 at 11:30 AM

Richard Dawkins may be our most renowned atheist, but he loves the King James Bible and urges us to celebrate its 400th anniversary

http://richarddawkins.net/articles/563745-forgive-me-spirit-of-science

A look at the eonic effect will show the strange way in which many of our classic transitions produce a new epic literature, and in the modern case the King James version of the Bible. It is ironically part of the ‘macroevolution’ visible in the eonic effect.
Secularists should look on the King James as an epic literature, one that, as with the Iliad/Odyssey seems to be moving into the past, and yet which stands superior to what comes later. The eonic effect is filled with such effects.

http://history-and-evolution.com/whee4th/chap5_1.htm: Scroll down for the quote below. The literature of the Greek Axial Age next to the epic of the Old Testament show us the historical mechanics behind these bursts of great literature.

The Iliad, in perfect timing The Old Testament is confusing. See what is happening by looking at the emergence of Greek epic, a perfect case of stream and sequence dynamics (the bardic tradition is a stream, its moment of glory sequence). The Iliad is the first great manifestation of the new era. As Herman Frankel asks at the beginning of Early Greek Poetry and Philosophy, “For us Greek literature begins with the Homeric Iliad and the Odyssey. Why, unlike the literatures of other peoples, does it start at once with such brilliant and mature creations? Why does it not crawl painfully into view out of murky depths, gradually gaining sureness of form and clarity of content?”. With Greece, we see the full effect that is less apparent than if we skim a few prophets or religious founders off the top of the data. For here we see, as in the case of China, the full effects of economic, artistic, scientific, political and religious evolution. One difficulty with a scientific analysis of this Greek transitional period is the fact that science itself emerges from this very period under study

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