What Were Dinosaurs For? | by Verlyn Klinkenborg | The New York Review of Books

As I was reading some recent books on dinosaurs, I kept wondering, “What were dinosaurs for?” It’s a ridiculous question, and I wondered why I was wondering it. After all, dinosaurs were “for” exactly what we are “for,” what every organism has been “for” since life began. Every species that has ever lived is a successful experiment in the enterprise of living, and every species is closely kinned at the genetic level with all other species. This is harder to grasp than it seems, partly because the logic of that Satanic preposition—“for”—is so insidious, so woven through the problem of time. Teleology is the moralizing of chronology, and nowadays science tries to keep watch for even the slightest trace of it, any suggestion that evolution has a direction tending to culminate in us or in what we like to call intelligence or in any other presumably desirable end point.

Source: What Were Dinosaurs For? | by Verlyn Klinkenborg | The New York Review of Books

Sabine Hossenfelder on why the Anthropic Principle is controversial 

It’s controversial because it is sometimes used to support the idea of a multiverse. Otherwise, it should be common sense to assume that a venue in which we exist must feature conditions that allow for that. But the multiverse does not need logic, evidence, or science.

Source: Sabine Hossenfelder on why the Anthropic Principle is controversial | Uncommon Descent

Biologists Discover That Flower Shapes Evolve to Adapt to Their Pollinators

Modularity Facilitates Rapid Adaptation of Single Floral Organs to Different Pollinators The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. They are the most diverse plant group on Earth with more than 300,000 species. In a new study published in Communic

Source: Biologists Discover That Flower Shapes Evolve to Adapt to Their Pollinators

How does language emerge? New study provides insights into the first steps — ScienceDaily

How did the almost 6,000 languages of the world come into being? Researchers have tried to simulate the process of developing a new communication system in an experiment — with surprising results: even preschool children can spontaneously develop communication systems that exhibit core properties of natural language.

Source: How does language emerge? New study provides insights into the first steps — ScienceDaily

How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life

Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth’s dimly lit early climate warm, and in forming the world’s largest iron ore deposits billions of years ago.

Source: How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life: The research provides a possible explanation to the ‘faint-young-sun’ paradox, originated by astronomer Carl Sagan — ScienceDaily