New study reveals life’s earliest evolution was more complicated than previously suspected 

New research from Tokyo Tech and the Max Planck Institute suggests understanding early life may be trickier than previously thought.Their analyses confirm other work which suggested that only a limited understanding of the lifestyle of the most ancient cells can be derived from DNA comparison. While it is clear that we don’t know what the first organisms metabolized or where they lived, their work provides insight into how quickly they may have evolved billions of years ago.

Source: New study reveals life’s earliest evolution was more complicated than previously suspected | EurekAlert! Science News

‘Silent Spring Is Already Here’: Global Study Shows Nearly 25% Drop in Insect Numbers the Past 30 Years 

“We keep getting clear signs that the way we live and the actions we take are having severe consequences.”

Source: ‘Silent Spring Is Already Here’: Global Study Shows Nearly 25% Drop in Insect Numbers the Past 30 Years | Common Dreams News

How birds evolved big brains: Brain evolution traced from tyrannosaurs to modern crows 

Evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds.

Source: How birds evolved big brains: Brain evolution traced from tyrannosaurs to modern crows — ScienceDaily

‘Designer virus’ is first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years: Phase 1 trial shows promise for completion of stalled eradication effort; offers lessons for COVID-19 vaccine development — ScienceDaily

Virologists report promising Phase 1 clinical results for the first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years, which they have designed to be incapable of evolving the ability to cause disease in humans.

Source: ‘Designer virus’ is first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years: Phase 1 trial shows promise for completion of stalled eradication effort; offers lessons for COVID-19 vaccine development — ScienceDaily