‘Openly Declaring Their Illegal Whaling Activities,’ Japan Abandons Global Effort to Protect Whale Population

“As a country surrounded by oceans where people’s lives have been heavily reliant on marine resources, it is essential for Japan to work towards healthy oceans. Japan’s government has so far failed to resolve these problems.”

Source: ‘Openly Declaring Their Illegal Whaling Activities,’ Japan Abandons Global Effort to Protect Whale Population

Feser (and Ross) on the immateriality of the mind | Uncommon Descent

Edward Feser has presented a lecture on the immateriality of the mind, which is worth listening to:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNi0j19ZSpoThe papers here and here will flesh out details.The core logic of the argument pivots on the principle of distinct identity, turned to how disti

Source: Feser (and Ross) on the immateriality of the mind | Uncommon Descent

Looking for a Shred of Good News on Global Warming? Consider the Explosion of Cheaper Clean Energy

Can we decarbonize the global economy as quickly as we need to? It’s a daunting task that will likely require much more effort — from our best engineers, but also from individuals and government leaders… It’s clear that 2018 was a terrible year for Earth’s climate. California saw the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in its history, the continually thawing Arctic got down to the last 5% of its oldest and thickest ice, and after slowing in recent years, greenhouse gas emissions were once again on the rise. This year was the fourth hottest on record.

Source: Looking for a Shred of Good News on Global Warming? Consider the Explosion of Cheaper Clean Energy

Last hominin standing – charting our rise and the fall of our closest relatives | Aeon Videos

Through genome sequencing, we now know that chimpanzees are our closest living relatives, sharing nearly 99 per cent of our DNA. But in the roughly 7 million years since our ancestors split from chimps, Homo sapiens has existed alongside a wide variety of closer evolutionary cousins. This video from the American Museum of Natural History tracks scientists’ current best guess at a timeline of hominin species, including when and where they lived, and how extinctions and interbreeding led to Homo sapiens becoming the last hominin on Earth. And yet, due to gaps in the timeline and continued fossil discoveries, it seems we’ve found only fragments of our evolutionary past, leaving much still to be learned about our family tree.

Source: Last hominin standing – charting our rise and the fall of our closest relatives | Aeon Videos