Bonobo diet of aquatic greens may hold clues to human evolution — ScienceDaily

Observations of bonobos in the Congo basin foraging in swamps for aquatic herbs rich in iodine, a critical nutrient for brain development and higher cognitive abilities, may explain how the nutritional needs of prehistoric humans in the region were met. This is the first report of iodine consumption by a nonhuman primate.

Source: Bonobo diet of aquatic greens may hold clues to human evolution — ScienceDaily

Evolution of life in the ocean changed 170 million years ago 

New research identifies a previously overlooked global event which changed the course of the evolution of life in the oceans. It coincided with a rise in calcium carbonate-secreting plankton and their subsequent deposition on the ocean floor.

Source: Evolution of life in the ocean changed 170 million years ago — ScienceDaily

Breeding Insects and Reproducing White Supremacy in Maria Sibylla Merian’s Ecology of Dispossession 

Even though German-Dutch naturalist Maria Sibylla Merian has been dead for over 300 years, she is currently having a moment in popular crafting culture and in children’s literature. Merian is featured on Etsy ; she is frequently pinned on Pinterest ; and you can read about her curiosity for bu

Source: Breeding Insects and Reproducing White Supremacy in Maria Sibylla Merian’s Ecology of Dispossession — Lady Science

A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record 

Instead of the typical bell-shaped curve, the fossil record shows a fat-tailed distribution, with extreme, outlier events occurring with higher-than-expected probability. Using the same mathematical tools that describe stock market crashes, scientists explain the evolutionary dynamics that give rise to universal patterns in the fossil record.

Source: A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record — ScienceDaily

Climate impact of clouds made from airplane contrails may triple by 2050 –

In the right conditions, airplane contrails can linger in the sky as contrail cirrus — ice clouds that can trap heat inside the atmosphere. Their climate impact has been largely neglected in schemes to offset aviation emissions, even though contrail cirrus have contributed more to warming than all CO2 emitted by aircraft since the start of aviation. A new Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics study found that the climate impact of contrail cirrus will triple by 2050.

Source: Climate impact of clouds made from airplane contrails may triple by 2050 — ScienceDaily