Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals

Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems. At the time, 600 million years ago, virtually all animal species were cold-blooded. They had to spend long periods of time in warm areas of their habitat to achieve fever-range body temperatures. A researcher believes that pathogens may be the reason why warm-blooded creatures first emerged.

Source: Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals: Fever may be less effective at repelling infections in cold-blooded creatures — ScienceDaily

Danger avoidance can be genetically encoded for four generations, say biologists

Researchers have discovered that learned behaviors can be inherited for multiple generations in C. elegans, transmitted from parent to progeny via eggs and sperm cells.

Source: Danger avoidance can be genetically encoded for four generations, say biologists: Scientists found that learned behaviors in C. elegans can be conveyed through the germline for multiple generations — ScienceDaily

Greenpeace Report: Real Climate Leadership – Greenpeace USA

The next President and Congress must adopt policies to phase out domestic fossil fuel production as part of any comprehensive climate policy effort like a Green New Deal. This fossil fuel phase out should occur in tandem with policies to boost renewable energy and ensure a just transition for workers, communities and tribal nations.

Source: Greenpeace Report: Real Climate Leadership – Greenpeace USA

A 1980 N.Y.Times article 

The discussion of micro- and macroevolution and of the fossil record almost sounds like something from the Discovery Institute blog, the kind of honest assessment of Darwinism which today could cause a biology teacher to lose his/her job. The Times writer assures us, however, that all of this does not suggest “weakness in the fact of evolution”, only in the “perceived mechanism.”

Source: A 1980 N.Y.Times article | Uncommon Descent