“Coincidence?” –Climate Change May Have Powered Evolution of Human Intelligence 

  Following the appearance of the neocortex some 250,000 years in our past, Homo sapiens evolved as the only species on planet Earth that created sophisticated technology from the clock to the radio and the quantum computer. In Apeman to Spaceman, the BBC reported that about two million years ago, something extraordinary started happening in […]

Source: “Coincidence?” –Climate Change May Have Powered Evolution of Human Intelligence (Weekend Feature) | The Daily Galaxy

Ancestors of modern birds became warm blooded very early in their evolution  

Experts from Hebrew University of Jerusalem studied the chemical bonds of the egg shells to find the likely body temperature of the dinosaur inside and its mother.

Source: Ancestors of modern birds became warm blooded very early in their evolution  | Daily Mail Online

The anatomy, paleobiology, and evolutionary relationships of the largest extinct side-necked turtle 

Despite being among the largest turtles that ever lived, the biology and systematics of Stupendemys geographicus remain largely unknown because of scant, fragmentary finds. We describe exceptional specimens and new localities of S. geographicus from the Miocene of Venezuela and Colombia. We document the largest shell reported for any extant or extinct turtle, with a carapace length of 2.40 m and estimated mass of 1.145 kg, almost 100 times the size of its closest living relative, the Amazon river turtle Peltocephalus dumerilianus , and twice that of the largest extant turtle, the marine leatherback Dermochelys coriacea . The new specimens greatly increase knowledge of the biology and evolution of this iconic species. Our findings suggest the existence of a single giant turtle species across the northern Neotropics, but with two shell morphotypes, suggestive of sexual dimorphism. Bite marks and punctured bones indicate interactions with large caimans that also inhabited the northern Neotropics.

Source: The anatomy, paleobiology, and evolutionary relationships of the largest extinct side-necked turtle | Science Advances